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I'm writing a book, tentatively titled Six Impossible Things. It's about a teenaged girl, a bit of a misfit, and her wonderful brother. The brother is hit by a car and dies in the first chapter, and the girl is convinced that there is a way to get him back. It's sort of science fiction/fantasy, I suppose.

Until I finish, go read some books by Richard Grant:
(For more about Richard, go here.)

Another Green World
“I read Another Green World with both wonder and awe. Its scope and sweep are breathtaking, its understanding of human nature both mysterious and profound, its heart and empathy exhilarating."
–Richard Russo

Another Green World is unlike any other World War II novel I’ve ever read. At times it made me think of Thomas Mann, at other times Graham Greene. In the end, though, the voice and the vision are all Richard Grant’s, and it’s important to remember that name, because you will be hearing it a lot in the months ahead. This book is an original work of art.”
–Steve Yarbrough

Kaspian Lost
I just reread this book. It gets better every time. Publisher's Weekly notes that the book displays an "acute ear for adolescent angst and a plot a step or two left of reality."

In the Land of Winter
Library Journal calls this book "a delightful modern fairy tale."

Tex and Molly in the Afterlife
Two hippies fall down a well and die in the first few pages. Then things really get interesting. Publisher's Weekly notes that "Grant's novel combines the literate but gonzo artistry of Tom Robbins with the obsessive spirituality of dedicated New Agers."

Through the Heart
This may be the book that led The Washington Post to call Richard "either a genius or a madman." (I'd kill to have the Post say that about me.)

Views from the Oldest House
Library Journal notes that the "borders of reality and fantasy collide in this kaleidoscopic foray into magical realism by the author of Rumors of Spring." Highly recommended by LJ.

Rumors of Spring
From Library Journal: "To an ecological polemic along the lines of Ursula Le Guin, Grant adds antic characters and bittersweet whimsy recalling J. P. Donleavy."

Saraband of Lost Time
A lyrical science fiction novel. (I've got to find my copy so I can scan the cover. At least half of our books are in boxes, waiting for us to build in some more shelves.)


Other favorite books:

Childhood favorites:

Favorite books read recently:

Favorite science fiction (other than books included above):

Favorite horror fiction:

Favorite fantasy fiction (other than books included above):

Favorite mystery fiction:

Favorite fiction written by 18th - 19th century unmarried women living in small English villages:


Several people have asked me who this Richard Grant guy is.

I've known Richard since we met in Spanish IV when I was fifteen. Julian has known him since grade school. Richard was our school's hippie/student body president, if you can imagine such a creature. I lost track of him after we went to college. I heard through friends that he'd gone into the Coast Guard, to which I said, "What???" He had, though, after finishing at the University of Virginia. Then he left the Coast Guard and started writing (which was much more in keeping with what I would have expected of him). When I ran into him again online, he had just published Tex and Molly in the Afterlife. Critics have compared Richard to everyone from Kurt Vonnegut to Thomas Mann, which is quite a range.

Richard lives in Lincolnville, ME. He has three kids. His daughter, Callie, shared ownership of Ariel, the golden-capped conure, with our youngest, Meghan. We visit him whenever we can get up there. He won't come anywhere farther south than northern Virginia, though.

You can find out more about Richard at these links:


Note about W3C validation on this page: The links to the books on Amazon won't validate. They just won't. There's nothing I can do about it. They generate a truly shocking number of errors, but I want to use the links, so I'm putting up with them.

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